List of Current Prisoners at Guantanamo

 Steven Lane | February 2, 2021
 

Name

ISN

Date of Transfer

Days held by CIA

Status

Uthman Abdul Mohammed Uthman

27

16 Jan. 2002

N/A

Yemeni. He won his habeas corpus lawsuit on Feb. 24, 2010 but lost after the U.S. government appealed to the U.S. Appeals Court for the District of Columbia Circuit, which overturned the release order on March 29, 2011. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war,” an indefinite detainee. A Periodic Review Board upheld his indefinite detention status on May 26, 2016, as did a follow-up review on April 24, 2018 that profiled him as veteran of the Tora Bora battle who was at one time selected to be a bodyguard to Osama bin Laden.

Moath Hamza Ahmed al Alwi

28

16 Jan. 2002

N/A

Yemeni. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war,” an indefinite detainee. A Periodic Review Board upheld his indefinite detention status on Oct. 26, 2015. His military advocate protested a glitch at his hearing, and he was granted reconsideration and on multiple occasions had his indefinite detention status upheld. Alwi gained prominence as a cellblock artist who built ship models from castoff cardboard and other found objects that were on display in a New York City art exhibition that became controversial.

Ridah bin Saleh al Yazidi

38

11 Jan. 2002

N/A

Tunisian. Arrived the day the prison opened, Jan. 11, 2002. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release. Little is known about why he isn’t gone but military and civilian sources have said he has repeatedly declined to meet with representatives of countries that would take him in for resettlement.

Ali Hamza Ahmad Suliman al-Bahlul

39

11 Jan. 2002

N/A

Yemeni. Arrived the day the prison opened, Jan. 11, 2002. A military commission convicted him of war crimes on Nov. 3, 2008 and sentenced him to life at Guantánamo for working as Osama bin Laden’s media secretary in Afghanistan. His Pentagon appellate attorneys got a portion of his conviction overturned, and are still pursuing appeals. They currently have a petition at the U.S. Supreme Court. Meantime, he was last known to be segregated as a convict at Guantánamo’s Camp 6 Hotel Block. As a convicted war criminal, he is not entitled to a Periodic Review Board evaluation.

Mohammed al-Qahtani

63

13 Feb. 2002

N/A

Saudi. Profiled as a suspected would-be 20th hijacker in the Sept. 11 terror attacks because he tried to enter the United States on Aug. 4, 2001, and was turned away by an immigration officer. He was subjected to such cruel “enhanced interrogation techniques” at Guantánamo that a senior Pentagon official, Susan Crawford, told The Washington Post’s Bob Woodward that she concluded he was tortured in U.S. custody, and in May 2008 dropped charges against him alleging he was a co-conspirator in the Sept. 11 plot. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial. The Periodic Review Board upheld his detention on July 18, 2016, re-branding him as an indefinite detainee, a status subsequently upheld on Feb. 16, 2018. His lawyers argue he has long suffered from mental illness, and should be repatriated to “long-term or permanent psychiatric confinement.”

Khalid Ahmad Qassim

242

1 May 2002

N/A

Yemeni. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war,” an indefinite detainee. The Periodic Review Board most recently upheld that indefinite detention status on Feb. 21, 2018. His lawyer said he discovered art at Guantánamo, and in late 2016 began showcasing it to journalists on periodic media tours. When he went before the board for his second, every-three-year review on Jan. 30, 2018 a U.S. military officer said the man who arrived at Guantánamo at age 25 in 2002 matured in detention. “Some of his artwork was recently showcased at an art show in New York City,” the unnamed military officer said. “And the reviews were positive.”

Abdul Latif Nasir

244

3 May 2002

N/A

Moroccan. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war,” an indefinite detainee, a forever prisoner. But a Periodic Review Board lifted the forever prisoner designation approved him for repatriation with security arrangements on July 11, 2016. Obama administration diplomats arranged for his repatriation, but the release package got to Secretary of Defense Ash Carter’s desk too late.

Muieen Adeen Abd al Sattar

309

9 Feb. 2002

N/A

Born in UAE. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release. Pentagon officials have described him as an ethnic Rohingya Burmese, complicating their ability to find a nation to take him in for resettlement. Because he was cleared for release before the establishment of the Periodic Review Board, he does not have to go before the national security parole panel to articulate his vision for life after Guantánamo. Little is known about him.

Suhayl al Sharabi

569

5 May 2002

N/A

Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial. He’s never been charged with a crime. The Periodic Review Board upheld his indefinite detention on March 31, 2016. A subsequent Jan. 24, 2018 file review also upheld that status. A brief 2018 Pentagon profile identified him as a bodyguard for Osama bin Laden.

Ghassan Abdullah al Sharbi

682

19 June 2002

N/A

Saudi. During the Bush administration he was designated for trial by a now defunct version of the military commissions charging him with a crime, providing material support for terror, that the war court prosecutor considers no longer viable. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial. But he never was charged during the Obama administration and the Periodic Review Board declared him too dangerous to release on July 26, 2016. A subsequent Feb. 16, 2018 file review also upheld that status. Before the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks Sharbi attended a flight school in the United States.

Abdul Razak Ali Abdelrahman

685

19 June 2002

N/A

Algerian. A federal judge upheld his indefinite detention as June 23, 2011, denying the habeas corpus petition of this Taliban government media spokesman, governor and Cabinet minister. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial. He’s never been charged with a crime. The Periodic Review Board upheld his detention on July 6, 2016. A subsequent review on Aug. 21, 2018 also upheld that status. The U.S. holds him as Said bin Brahim bin Umran Bakush, and says he was a “trusted associate” of Abu Zubaydah, who is held apart from him.

Sufiyan Barhoumi

694

18 June 2002

N/A

Algerian. During the Bush administration he was designated for trial by a now defunct version of the military commissions. A federal judge upheld his indefinite detention on Sept. 3, 2009, denying his habeas corpus petition, and a three-judge panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit upheld that decision detention on Jun. 22, 2010. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial. The Periodic Review Board, declared him approved for transfer, with security arrangements, on Aug. 9, 2016. His lawyers say he plans to open a pizza parlor on his return to Algiers. U.S. diplomats arranged for his repatriation, but the Secretary of Defense Ash Carter declined to sign off on it before time ran out in the Obama administration.

Ismael Ali Faraj al Bakush

708

5 August 2002

N/A

Libyan. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war,” an indefinite detainee. He has never been charged with a crime. The Periodic Review Board upheld that forever prisoner status on Feb. 16, 2018, declaring him still too dangerous too release, and again in August 2018. The U.S. military considers him an al-Qaida trained explosives experts from the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group.

Hani Saleh Rashid Abdullah

841

28 October 2002

30-39

Yemeni. Also has been known as Said Salih Said Nashir since he got to Guantánamo Oct. 28, 2002. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war,” an indefinite detainee. He went before the Periodic Review Board April 21, 2016, which upheld his indefinite detention after multiple reviews, including on Jan 24, 2018.

Toffiq Nassar Ahmed al Bihani

893

6 Feb. 2002

50-59

Yemeni. A federal judge upheld his indefinite detention on Sept. 22, 2010, denying his habeas corpus petition. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves — or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found. His attorney has said he had been designated at times for release but the Pentagon failed to do it. His brother, Ghaleb, was released to the custody of Oman in the dwindling days of the Obama administration.

Omar Mohammed Ali al Rammah (Zakaria)

1017

9 May 2003

370- 379

Yemeni. A chart accompanying the Senate Intelligence Committee ‘Torture Report’ indicates a captive known as “Zakariya,” his nickname, was held by the CIA for 360 days or more. That accounts for a gap in his Guantánamo prisoner profile between his capture in Georgia and transfer to U.S. military custody on April 9, 2003 at Bagram, Afghanistan, a month before he was sent to Guantánamo. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war,” an indefinite detainee. The Periodic Review Board upheld his indefinite detention status on Aug. 22, 2016. He had a subsequent review on Feb. 9, 2017, arguing through a representative his post-release plan “to put Guantanamo behind him and become a contributing member of society.” No decision was released as 2018 drew to a close.

Saifullah Paracha

1094

19 Sept. 2004

N/A

Pakistani. He got to Guantánamo on Sept. 19, 2004. A former U.S. green card holder, he is also the eldest of the Guantánamo detainees, according to leaked detention center records. He was captured in Thailand on July 5, 2003 and the U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee ‘Torture Report’ says, while it was an FBI orchestrated operation, the CIA wanted to take custody of him and question him with enhanced interrogation techniques. The proposal was rejected. He was born in Aug. 17, 1947, and has a history of coronary artery disease. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial. He’s never been charged with a crime but the Periodic Review Board upheld his indefinite detention on April 7, 2016, making him an indefinite detainee in the war on terror. He later told the board he would close out his businesses, essentially retire, to reassure the U.S. of his intentions. But the board rejected that offer, citing his “indifference to his the impact of his prior actions and the lack of evidence of significant mitigation measures." Then a September 2018 review, denying his request for release, concluded that “recent changes in his family and financial situation show a lack of available support should he be transferred.”

Sanad Ali Yislam al-Kazimi

1453

19 Sept. 2004

270-279

Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial. He’s never been charged with a crime although internal Defense Department documents show that in late 2014 he was still considered a candidate for a war crimes trial. The Periodic Review Board declared him too dangerous to release on June 9, 2016.

Hassan Mohammed Ali bin Attash

1456

19 Sept. 2004

120 129

Yemeni. According to leaked military records, he is the youngest of the current detainees. He is also the brother of high-value detainee Walid Bin Attash, held in a different camp. His lawyer says they’ve never seen each other at Guantánamo. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial. But he’s never been charged with a crime and the Periodic Review Board declared him too dangerous to release on Oct. 11, 2016.

Sharqawi Abdu Ali al-Hajj

1457

19 Sept. 2004

120 129

Yemeni. AKA Riyadh the Facilitator who got to Guantánamo Sept. 19, 2004. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial. He’s never been charged with a crime but Defense Department documents showed that in late 2014 he was still considered a candidate for a war crimes trial. The Periodic Review Board declared him too dangerous to release on April 14, 2016. A subsequent review upheld that decision on Sept. 13, 2018.

Abdul Rahim Ghulam Rabbani

1460

19 Sept. 2004

550-559

Pakistani. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial. He’s never been charged with a crime and the Periodic Review Board upheld his detention on Aug. 8, 2016. He chose not to go before the board for a subsequent review that upheld that status on Feb. 27, 2018. That decision described him as a facilitator who helped move and house al-Qaida “fighters and key figures” for Khalid Sheik Mohammed.

Mohammed Ahmed Ghulam Rabbani (Abu Badr)

1461

19 Sept. 2004

550- 559

Pakistani. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial. He’s never been charged with a crime. The Periodic Review Board upheld his detention on Oct. 3, 2016, re-branding him as an indefinite detainee — just like his brother, Abdul Rahim.

Abd al Salam al Hela

1463

19 Sept. 2004

590- 599

Yemeni. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war,” an indefinite detainee. A Periodic Review Board, upheld that status on June 19, 2018. The U.S. military considers him a “prominent extremist facilitator” who helped al-Qaida through his links to the Yemeni Political Security Organization. He was also a founding director of a prison group that in 2013 wrote a prospectus for a Yemeni “Milk & Honey” farm to present to the review board as a vision for life after release from prison.

Asadullah Haroon Gul (Haroon al-Afghani)

3148

22 June 2007

N/A

Afghan. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial. He’s never been charged with a crime and a Periodic Review Board upheld his indefinite detention in the war on terror on Aug. 9, 2018. The U.S. military considers him to be a former Hezb-e-Islami Gulbuddin, or HIG, commander who organized and led attacks on U.S. forces in Afghanistan.

 

Mustafa Ahmad al-Hawsawi

10011

4 Sept. 2006

1,280-1,289

Saudi. Charged in death-penalty proceedings by military commission as an alleged co-conspirator in the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. The ICRC says Pakistani authorities arrested him March 1, 2003 in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. As a former CIA “black site” captive who was taken to Guantánamo in September 2006, he is held at Camp 7, a secret prison where the Pentagon segregates high-value detainees. Since he is charged with a crime, he is not entitled to a Periodic Review Board evaluation.

Ramzi bin al Shibh

10013

4 Sept. 2006

1,300-1,309

Yemeni. Charged in death-penalty proceedings by military commission as an alleged co-conspirator in the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. The ICRC says Pakistani authorities arrested him Sept. 11, 2002 in Karachi, Pakistan. As a former CIA “black site” captive who was taken to Guantánamo in September 2006, he is held at Camp 7. The Senate Intelligence Committee “Torture Report” says he was in CIA custody, including at Guantánamo, from September 2003 into April 2004. He chose not to go before a military panel at Guantánamo in March 2007; it subsequently upheld his status as an enemy combatant. Since he is charged with a crime, he is not entitled to a Periodic Review Board evaluation.

Khallad (Walid) bin Attash

10014

4 Sept. 2006

1,200- 1209

Yemeni. He’s charged in death-penalty proceedings by military commission as an alleged co-conspirator in the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. The ICRC says Pakistani authorities arrested him on April 29, 2003 in Karachi, Pakistan. As a former CIA “black site” captive who was taken to Guantánamo in September 2006, he is held at Camp 7. Since he is charged with a crime, he is not entitled to a Periodic Review Board evaluation.

Abd al Rahial-Nashiri

10015

4 Sept. 2006

1,390-1,399

Saudi. He’s charged in death-penalty proceedings by military commission as an alleged conspirator in the October 2000 al Qaida suicide bombing of the USS Cole off Aden, Yemen. The ICRC says he was arrested in October 2002 in Dubai, the United Arab Emirates. The Senate Intelligence Committee “Torture Report” says he was in CIA custody, including at Guantánamo, from September 2003 into April 2004. As a former CIA “black site” captive who was taken to Guantánamo in September 2006, he is held at Camp 7. Since he is charged with a crime, he is not entitled to a Periodic Review Board evaluation.

Abu Zubaydah (Zayn al Abidin Muhammad Husayn)

10016

4 Sept. 2006

1,610-1,690

Palestinian. AKA Abu Zubaydah. The ICRC says he was arrested March 28, 2002 in Faisalabad, Pakistan. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial but he’s never been charged with a crime. He went before the Periodic Review Board Aug. 23, 2016, which announced a month later that he was too dangerous to release. He has been described on multiple occasions as a respected block leader at Camp 7.

Mustafa Faraj Muhammad Mas’ud al-Jadid al-Uzaybi (Abu Faraj al-Libi)

10017

4 Sept. 2006

460 469

Libyan. The ICRC says Pakistani authorities arrested him on May 2, 2005 in Mardan, Pakistan. As a former CIA “black site” captive who was taken to Guantánamo in September 2006, he is held at Camp 7. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial but he’s never been charged with a crime. His personal representative, a U.S. military officer, said he boycotted his hearing before a military panel at Guantánamo on March 9, 2007. “He’s waiting for legal proceedings.” His case went before the Periodic Review Board Aug. 16, 2016 for a status determination decision. He did not attend the hearing. The panel declared him an indefinite detainee, on Sept. 16, 2016.

Ammar al Baluchi

10018

4 Sept. 2006

1,200- 1209

Pakistani. He’s charged in death-penalty proceedings by military commission as an alleged co-conspirator in the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. The ICRC says Pakistani authorities arrested him on April 29, 2003 in Karachi, Pakistan. As a former CIA “black site” captive who was taken to Guantánamo in September 2006, he is held at Camp 7. Since he is charged with a crime, he is not entitled to a Periodic Review Board evaluation.

Riduan bin Isomuddin (Hambali)

10019

4 Sept. 2006

1,110-1,119

Indonesian. AKA Hambali. The International Red Cross says he was arrested Aug. 11, 2003 in Bangkok, Thailand. As a former CIA “black site” captive, he is held in at Camp 7. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial. The Periodic Review Board declared him an indefinite detainee on Sept. 19, 2016. But then in June 2017, the Pentagon war crimes prosecutor swore out terror charges against him, suggesting he might one day face trial by military commission, and saying separately that he would not seek the death penalty in the case. The prosecutor re-swore charges as part of a three-man conspiracy in December 2017, but the overseer of the war court has not decided whether to let the case go forward. The Senate Torture Report quotes a CIA interrogator as telling Hambali in an undisclosed agency prison “that he would never go to court, because ‘we can never let the world know what I have done to you.’”

Majid Khan

10020

4 Sept. 2006

1,200- 1209

Pakistani. The International Red Cross says this Baltimore area educated man was arrested March 5, 2003 in Karachi, Pakistan. As a former CIA “black site” captive, he was taken to Guantánamo in September 2006 and held at Camp 7. He turned government witness and pleaded guilty to war crimes Feb. 29, 2012, and is held in a separate secret site for cooperating ex-CIA captive witnesses at Guantánamo. In June 2015, his attorneys released then recently unclassified versions of their conversations with Khan, who described two episodes of waterboarding not described in the U.S. Senate report. The public portion of the Senate report offered a description of his being “rectally infused” with a a pureed “food tray” of hummus, pasta with sauce, nuts, and raisins because he was on a hunger strike. His sentencing is now scheduled for July 1, 2019. Since he is charged with a crime, he is not entitled to a Periodic Review Board evaluation.

Mohammed Farik bin Amin (Zubair)

10021

4 Sept. 2006

1,170-1,179

Malaysian. AKA Zubair. The ICRC says he was arrested June 8, 2003 in Bangkok, Thailand. As a former CIA “black site” captive who was taken to Guantánamo in September 2006, he is held at Camp 7. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial. He went before a military panel at Guantánamo in March 13, 2007. Transcript here. He went before the Periodic Review Board Aug. 9, 2016; the panel approved his indefinite detention in the war on terror. In December 2017, however, the war court prosecutor swore charges against him and two other men in an alleged three-person conspiracy to commit terror attacks in Southeast Asia. The next step would be for the Pentagon overseer of military commissions to approve them, which has not happened.

Mohammed Bashir bin Lep

10022

4 Sept. 2006

1,110-1,119

Malaysian. AKA Lilie. The ICRC says he was arrested Aug. 11, 2003 in Bangkok, Thailand. As a former CIA “black site” captive who was taken to Guantánamo in September 2006, he is held at Camp 7. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial. On Aug. 11, 2016 he went before the Periodic Review Board, which approved his indefinite detention in the war on terror. In December 2017, however, the war court prosecutor swore charges against him and two other men in an alleged three-person conspiracy to commit terror attacks in Southeast Asia. The next step would be for the Pentagon overseer of military commissions to approve them, which has not happened.

Hassan Guleed

10023

4 Sept. 2006

900- 909

Somali. Recommended for continued detention and possible transfer to detention in the U.S., but determined to be eligible for a Periodic Review Board in April 2013, his review took place in August 2016 and he was recommended for ongoing imprisonment in September 2016.

Khalid Shaikh Mohammad

10024

4 Sept. 2006

1,280- 1289

Pakistani. Charged in death-penalty proceedings by military commission as the alleged mastermind in the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. The ICRC says Pakistani authorities arrested him March 1, 2003 in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. As a former CIA “black site” captive who was taken to Guantánamo in September 2006, he is held at Camp 7. Since he is charged with a crime, he is not entitled to a Periodic Review Board evaluation.

Mohammed Abdul Malik Bajabu

10025

23 March 2007

N/A

Kenyan. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war,” an indefinite detainee. The Periodic Review Board declared him too dangerous to release on June 9, 2016, and has upheld his status through subsequent reviews. In the dwindling days of the Obama administration the White House offered to send the Kenyan to Israel for prosecution but that would require FBI collaboration with Israeli officials, which wasn’t forthcoming.

 

Nashwan al-Ramer Abdulrazzaq (Abd al Hadi al Iraqi)

 

10026

22 April 2007

170-179

Iraqi. He is held in a secret prison where the Pentagon segregates high-value detainees. He was arraigned June 18, 2014 and faces non-capital charges at the war court alleging he was commander of al-Qaida’s army between 2002 and 2004. If convicted, he could be punished with a maximum of life in prison. No trial date has been set yet, in part because some of his pretrial hearings have been derailed by his undergoing a series of emergency spine surgeries. At a May 17, 2016, pretrial hearing his lawyer announced that his real name was Nashwan al Tamir. Since he is charged with a crime, he is not entitled to a Periodic Review Board evaluation.

Muhammad Abdulrazzaq al-Afghani (Muhammad Rahim al-Afghani ? )

10029

13 March 2008

240-249

Afghan. He is held in a secret prison where the Pentagon segregates high-value detainees. A multiagency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war,” an indefinite detainee. The Periodic Review Board upheld his status on Sept. 19, 2016. The chief war crimes prosecutor, Army Brig. Gen. Mark Martins, said in a May 26, 2016 letter that a war crimes prosecution against Rahim is unlikely.