Wikileaks

Army Prepares Trial for Bradley Manning

by Trent Nouveau 

The US Army is preparing to conduct a pre-trial hearing for Pfc. Bradley Manning. The soldier stands accused of transferring thousands of classified documents that eventually ended up on the whistle-blowing WikiLeaks site.



According to the Washington Times, the trial has been delayed over "disagreements" between prosecutors and U.S. intelligence agencies over what types of classified information can be used to try Manning.

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What Did WikiLeaks Reveal?

via the Bradley Manning Support Network:

Download PDF version of article here.

“In no case shall information be classified… in order to: conceal violations of law, inefficiency, or administrative error; prevent embarrassment to a person, organization, or agency… or prevent or delay the release of information that does not require protection in the interest of the national security.”

—Executive Order 13526, Sec. 1.7. Classification Prohibitions and Limitations

“Is this embarrassing? Yes. Is this awkward? Yes. Consequences for U.S. foreign policy? I think fairly modest.”

—Robert Gates, Unites States Secretary of Defense

PFC Bradley Manning is a US Army intelligence specialist who is accused of releasing classified information to WikiLeaks, an organization that he allegedly understood would release portions of the information to news organizations and ultimately to the public.

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UN Torture Expert Calls for an End to Solitary Confinement

by Andy Worthington

On Tuesday, Professor Juan Méndez, the UN Special Rapporteur on Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, “called on all countries to ban the solitary confinement of prisoners except in very exceptional circumstances and for as short a time as possible, with an absolute prohibition in the case of juveniles and people with mental disabilities,” as a UN news release explained. Presenting his first interim report (PDF) on the practice to the UN General Assembly (which was published in August), Professor Méndez noted that the use of solitary confinement was “global in nature and subject to widespread abuse,” as the news release also explained.

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Cablegate Swings Open Forever: All US Cables Now Published by WikiLeaks

By Kevin Gosztola

Evgeny Morozov, author of The Net Delusion: The Dark Side of Internet Freedom, has an op-ed in the New York Times on how software and technology companies from France, South Africa and other countries supplied Colonel Muammar Gaddafi “spying gear.”

Morozov writes:

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WikiLeaks: Iraqi children in U.S. raid shot in head, U.N. says

Ishaqi Massacre, 2006

This cell phone photo was shot by a resident of Ishaqi on March 15, 2006, of bodies Iraqi police said were of children executed by U.S. troops after a night raid there. Click to enlarge.

By Matthew Schofield

A U.S. diplomatic cable made public by WikiLeaks provides evidence that U.S. troops executed at least 10 Iraqi civilians, including a woman in her 70s and a 5-month-old infant, then called in an airstrike to destroy the evidence, during a controversial 2006 incident in the central Iraqi town of Ishaqi.

The unclassified cable, which was posted on WikiLeaks' website last week, contained questions from a United Nations investigator about the incident, which had angered local Iraqi officials, who demanded some kind of action from their government. U.S. officials denied at the time that anything inappropriate had occurred.

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Dead Letters: More Confirmation of the Mass Murder that Marks the Modern World

By Chris FloydGeorge W. Bush and Tony Blair

Yet another confirmation has come to light of the machinations by the self-professed Christian leaders of the West to manipulate their nations into a murderous war of aggression against Iraq, the Guardian reports.

A letter has come to light confirming the UK government's firm intention to join the United States in the Hitlerian action against Iraq, even if a UN resolution specifically authorizing the action could not be obtained.

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PFC Bradley Manning, Conscience & Agency

By Ethan McCord, former Specialist U.S. Army 

Serving with my unit 2nd battalion 16th infantry in New Baghdad Iraq, I vividly remember the moment in 2007, when our Battalion Commander walked into the room and announced our new rules of engagement:

“Listen up, new battalion SOP (standing operating procedure) from now on: Anytime your convoy gets hit by an IED, I want 360 degree rotational fire. You kill every [expletive] in the street!”

We weren’t trained extensively to recognize an unlawful order, or how to report one. But many of us could not believe what we had just been told to do. Those of us who knew it was morally wrong struggled to figure out a way to avoid shooting innocent civilians, while also dodging repercussions from the non-commissioned officers who enforced the policy. In such situations, we determined to fire our weapons, but into rooftops or abandoned vehicles, giving the impression that we were following procedure.

On April 5, 2010 American citizens and people around the world got a taste of the fruits of this standing operating procedure when WikiLeaks released the now-famous Collateral Murder video. This video showed the horrific and wholly unnecessary killing of unarmed Iraqi civilians and Reuters journalists.

I was part of the unit that was responsible for this atrocity. In the video, I can be seen attempting to carry wounded children to safety in the aftermath.

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Collateral Murder: Ethan McCord Speaks in Los Angeles

Iraq veteran Ethan McCord appeared in the Wikileaked video Collateral Murder, as he rescued injured children. He spoke at Revolution Books in LA on June 9, 2011.

 

The High Stakes Persecution of Bradley Manning

Published in Revolution | June 26, 2011 Edition

There are new developments and high stakes In the U.S. government’s persecution of Bradley Manning. And a growing movement to defend him.

In April 2010, the video “Collateral Murder” was posted to the Internet by WikiLeaks. It has been viewed over 11 million times. The footage, taken from inside an Apache helicopter in 2007 over Baghdad, shows American troops cold-bloodedly gunning down 11 Iraqis, including two people who worked for the Reuters news agency and a man who had come onto the scene in a van to try to help the other victims. Two small children in the van were seriously injured by the gunfire. The video includes an audio track of voices of the soldiers in the helicopter during the attack. The soldiers can be heard repeatedly requesting and being granted permission to open fire, and joking with each other about the dead and injured victims on the ground.

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‘Collateral Murder’ at Eye Level

By Dan Bluemel

On a morning in April 2010, Ethan McCord came home from dropping his children off at school. He sat down on his couch with a cup of coffee and turned on the television to see a grainy, black-and-white image of a soldier running across a street in Iraq with a child in his arms.

He recognized that soldier. It was him.

WikiLeaks had just released a classified video of a U.S. Apache helicopter indiscriminately killing Iraqis in July 2007. Called “Collateral Murder,” the video was published on the WikiLeaks website on April 5, 2010 and quickly made headlines around the world.

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WikiLeaks and the 22 Children of Guantánamo

By Andy Worthington 

In May 2008, in a submission to the 48th Session of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child (PDF), the Pentagon claimed that it had only held eight juveniles — those under the age of 18 when their alleged crimes took place — during the life of the Guantánamo Bay prison. This, however, was a lie, as its own documents providing the names and dates of birth of prisoners, released in May 2006 (PDF), showed that the true total was much higher.

In November 2008, the UC Davis Center for the Study of Human Rights in the Americas published a report, “Guantánamo’s Children: Military and Diplomatic Testimonies,” presenting evidence that 12 juveniles had been held, and this was then officially acknowledged by the Pentagon.

The next week, however, I produced another report, “The Pentagon Can’t Count: 22 Juveniles Held at Guantánamo,” providing evidence that at least 22 juvenile prisoners had been held, and drawing on the Pentagon’s own documents, or on additional statements made by the Pentagon, to confirm my claims.

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World Can't Wait mobilizes people living in the United States to stand up and stop war on the world, repression and torture carried out by the US government. We take action, regardless of which political party holds power, to expose the crimes of our government, from war crimes to systematic mass incarceration, and to put humanity and the planet first.