Wikileaks

Torture FlagWikiLeaks has released some of the most damning evidence yet against the ongoing occuptions in Iraq and Afghanistan. For current news compiled about WikiLeaks, see wlcentral.org. To find out more about accused Wikileaker Bradley Manning, see bradleymanning.org.

Must read: US Response to Wikileaks: Diplomacy as Another Means of Warfare

Defend Julian Assange and Wikileaks.

Open Letter in Defence of WikiLeaks’ Right to Publish.

Bradley Manning: a Tale of Liberty Lost in America

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Guantánamo Files | Cablegate | Collateral Murder Video | Iraq War DiaryAfghan War Diary

Happy Birthday Chelsea Manning

Deb Vanpoolen | December 17, 2013

Chelsea ManningAlthough Private Manning vs. the United States was one of the most important trials in US history, no cameras were allowed inside the courtroom.  Without cameras in the courtroom, the world’s masses of people impacted by the Wikileaks releases could not be properly informed of the proceedings.  In the three years following the Wikileaks releases and Manning’s arrest, the mainstream US media provided miniscule coverage of anything to do with Private Manning, including her entire three-year pre-trial confinement and the two years of pre-trial hearings.

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#PardonManning Day Monday September 16

Debra Sweet | September 15, 2013

Pardon Chelsea ManningAmnesty International and the Bradley (now Chelsea) Manning Support Network initiated a petition on WhiteHouse.gov calling on Barack Obama to “grant clemency to Pvt. Bradley Manning.”  The petition requires 100,000 signatures by September 20 for the White House to have to comment on it, or it will die.  So far there are just over 24,000 signers.

We are almost 25% of the way to 100,000 signers, and must pick up momentum quickly.  On Monday September 16, #PardonManning Day, will you sign the peititon, and do the work to be sure that 5 of your friends, family, or colleagues do so?

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Unjust Sentence from a Criminal System: Bradley Manning* Sentenced to 35 Years in Federal Prison

Revolution | August 22, 2013

On August 21, amilitary judge handed down an outrageous sentence of 35 years in prison to Bradley Manning. Manning was convicted on multiple charges for his release to Wikileaks of thousands of computer files that contained damning, irrefutable evidence of U.S. atrocities, cover-ups, and deceit—in short, war crimes.

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Why Manning Matters

Dennis Loo | August 20, 2013

We are on the eve of Judge Lind’s sentencing of Bradley Manning. Protests are planned after the verdict is announced. Details on this are at the end of this article.

For context we should not forget that Obama, the man who promised “hope” and “change,” decided to charge Manning and ordered him kept in solitary isolation for nine months, subjecting him to conditions that the UN special rapporteur on torture labeled “cruel, inhuman and degrading,” as The Guardian reported on March 12, 2012:

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You Have Nothing to Be Sorry For: An Open Letter to Bradley Manning

Jill McLaughlin | August 15, 2013

Dear Bradley,

I read your statement to the judge via an article I saw yesterday. I read it very carefully and a number of thoughts went through my mind about your apology… the most important thought being is that you have nothing to apologize for.

In your apology to the judge you mention the issues that you had to deal with at the time you decided to expose the crimes of our government. You mention you were going through a lot personally:

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On Bradley Manning & Changing the World

Debra Sweet | August 15, 2013

There is, and should be, serious debate and discussion of how Bradley Manning affected our world by transferring a trove of classified US documents revealing war crimes to Wikileaks in 2010, and of his apology for doing so yesterday, in the process of demanding that he do not one more second in prison.

Bradley Manning took courageous action aimed at stopping what were, and will always remain, war crimes in pursuit of unjust, immoral, illegitimate occupations of Iraq  and Afghanistan.  He did much more than that, as Dennis Loo recaps in Because of Bradley Manning:

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Because of Bradley Manning

Dennis Loo | August 15, 2013

Because of Bradley Manning, we have Edward Snowden, who was inspired to come forward by Manning’s example;

Because of Bradley Manning, we know that most of the prisoners held at Guantanamo are innocent or low-level operatives and we have the identities and pictures of the prisoners held at Guantanamo who are now hunger striking (BradleyManning.org);

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Truth in the Crosshairs: the Trial of Bradley Manning

John Pilger | August 8, 2013

The critical moment in the political trial of the century was on 28 February when Bradley Manning stood and explained why he had risked his life to leak tens of thousands of official files. It was a statement of morality, conscience and truth: the very qualities that distinguish human beings. This was not deemed mainstream news in America; and were it not for Alexa O’Brien, an independent freelance journalist, Manning’s voice would have been silenced. Working through the night, she transcribed and released his every word. It is a rare, revealing document*.

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What Whistleblowers Reveal and Governments Seek to Conceal

Dennis Loo | July 31, 2013

Yesterday, the judge in Bradley Manning’s show trial found Manning guilty on nearly every charge but the most draconian of “aiding the enemy,” which could have brought the death penalty. If such a trial were going on in Russia today, what angle do you suppose we would hear from the U.S.’s major news outlets and from our highest public officials? That the Russian government was making sure to protect the welfare of the Russian people by going after spies out to harm the Russian people? Hardly. We'd be regaled with talk of how repressive and hypocritical Russia's leaders and system are. 

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Outrage that Bradley Found Guilty & War Crimimals are Free

Steering Committee of World Can't Wait | July 30, 2013

Today Bradley Manning was convicted in a military "show trial" of espionage and theft charges for making available to the public classified documents evidencing US war crimes and bullying of other countries. He could be sentenced to 136 years in prison.  The government’s prosecution aimed to make an example of Manning, imprisoning him under harsh conditions, and charging him with “aiding the enemy,” a capital offense, to intimidate others from standing up and speaking out against U.S. war crimes.

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