Military Recruitment

Get involved in the movement to stop military recruiters: wearenotyoursoldiers.org

We Are Not Your Soldiers Tour: On Both Coasts Last Weeks of High School

By Debra Sweet

Ethan McCord will be in southern California (Los Angeles and San Diego) June 9 - 11

Matthis Chiroux in Philadelphia, June 7.

James Brower, a Marine combat veteran of Afghanistan and Iraq, made his first appearance with the tour Monday at an NYC high school. Read the report/watch the videos.

We still have more requests from schools than we can fill! NEEDED: more veterans to speak about their experiences in the occupation of Iraq and Afghanistan; funds for transportation, child care and materials.  Every time they speak, students re-think their intention of signing up; grapple with the need to speak out against the wars; and go on to take this message to other students, friends, family members.

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“We Are Not Your Soldiers” in NYC High School

From We Are Not Your Soldiers 

On Monday, May 23rd, a new addition to the “We Are Not Your Soldiers” campaign spoke to a classroom of students, and teachers. Former USMC Staff Sgt. and scout sniper, James Brower from Brooklyn, NY, decided it was time that he spoke up and reached out to high school students who are in the most jeopardy of joining the military. James completed three combat tours, one in Afghanistan from 2001 to 2002, and two in Iraq, 2005 to 2006; and, 2009 to 2010.

He said he joined the marines because he “wanted to fight.” All through school he was always in fights, and thought it was something he might like doing, especially as a marine. But after his second tour, he had doubts. By his third tour, he knew what we were doing in Iraq and Afghanistan were wrong. He describes it by saying “there are old men who send young men to war, and they make lots and lots of money. Iraq was fine. They had electricity, internet, homes, families, jobs, clean water, until we got there…and there were no weapons of mass destruction.”

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We Are Not Your Soldiers in Philadelphia

From the report posted at wearenotyoursoldiers.org:

In each class, some students walked into class “disruptive” but when the film came on they were silent, captivated by the horror they were watching. This engagement lasted through the discussion. The youth were very shocked about what they saw in the video, especially the fact that there were children there. They called it scary, disgusting, heartless, and it elicited nervous laughter. In the afternoon one girl got teary eyed and when her friends made fun she said, “don’t laugh at me for crying this shit is sad.” One male student made a very true statement about the video, saying, “This is not a good advertisement for the military.”

Matthis’ point of being less of a man for having joined the military really resonated with students, nodding at what he was saying about losing your humanity in doing these acts. They were moved by both the video and Matthis’ further testimony to these outrages being daily occurrences and his use of the word genocide. It affected them that their government was just killing people in a neighborhood and it changed how they viewed the war. They could see the impact and they, for the most part, definitely didn’t want to be a part of it.

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We Are Not Your Soldiers at a Vermont High School

Another student... took off the national guard shirt he was wearing and gave it to Matthis saying he no longer would wear it.

By Joe Urgo, Viet Nam Veteran

Matthis Chiroux, Iraq war resister and part of the “We Are Not Your Soldiers” tour, and I met with three groups of students at a Vermont High School.

The first group of students was only about 10 in number, the second and third had about 30 students in each. In the two largest groups, 1/3 of one and 1/2 in the other had family and friends in the military. This is important to understand because everything we say can be taken as a personal attack on their family members and make it difficult for them to see the politics and policies that make up these wars for empire and the responsibility to end them. 

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This is Not Our War, We Are Not Your Soldiers

By Lauren Martino

“We Are Not Your Soldiers!,” a project of World Can’t Wait, is educating youth about military recruitment through bringing Iraq war veterans to speak in high schools about the reality of going to war for this country.

After the World Can’t Wait presentation, it was apparent that my students were affected. The next day one student showed me a poem he wrote about a young boy from the ghetto enlisting in the military and dying, another asked for a World Can’t Wait T-shirt, and yet another, who had wanted to join the military, handed me a recommendation form for a vocational school. Others are still lost forever to the military but the “We Are Not Your Soldiers” tour offered the education American youth really need and that more teachers need to be more conscious of.

 – Teacher from Paul Robeson High School
I am an 18-year-old intern at World Can’t Wait.  I feel this cause is very current, very serious, and in dire need of support. Not only is the organization trying to save the lives of my peers, but it is trying to open our eyes, light the fire of rebellion in our young spirits and get us to act on changing this world we are about to inherit.  The organization tries to reach students by visiting classrooms around the country and explaining the true nature of war through the example of personal experience—for instance, an Iraq war veteran named Ethan McCord who spoke at my school.

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Sexual Assault in the US Military: Who will become the next statistic?

Sexual Assault in the US Military:  Who will become the next statistic?

By Oskar Castro

The Service Women’s Action Network recently helped to file a class action suit on the behalf of a number of women and men who say they have been sexually victimized by their peers, or their commands in the military.  Former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld and current Secretary of Defense Robert Gates are named as the defendants whose complicit inattentiveness enabled a culture of silence and injustice to prevail.  While Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) has developed into a new buzz word as a result of the U.S. wars in the Middle East, Military Sexual Trauma (MST) is not something we often hear about and some argue that we don’t because the Pentagon does not want us to.  This landmark class action suit is yet another attempt to break the silence.

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Killing 'Really Addictive:' Veteran's Essay Leads to Ban From Campus

"He's writing about how something changes in you in a combat situation, and it's hard to turn that off in a civilian situation"

Emma Kaplan writes: This is pretty interesting and also outrageous - it shows the complete disconnect between what the government has been doing in the Middle East for the past 9 years and then complete surprise at the fact that there are people like this coming onto college campuses.

By Kim Carollo

In an essay for a college English class, Charles Whittington Jr. opened up about his feelings about his time in combat in Iraq and Afghanistan.

"Killing becomes a drug, and it is really addictive. I had a really hard time with this problem when I returned to the United States, because turning this addiction off was impossible," Whittington wrote in the essay for his class at the Community College of Baltimore County in Catonsville, Md.

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Demon Drones & War without Borders

By libbyliberal Drones

They don't get hungry. They are not afraid. They don't forget their orders. They don't care if the guy next to them has been shot. Will they do a better job than humans?
 
Yes. (They also don’t commit suicide, desert, suffer PTSD, become conscientious objectors, protest, talk to Rolling Stone or send embarrassing videos to Wikileaks!)
 

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About

World Can't Wait mobilizes people living in the United States to stand up and stop war on the world, repression and torture carried out by the US government. We take action, regardless of which political party holds power, to expose the crimes of our government, from war crimes to systematic mass incarceration, and to put humanity and the planet first.