The Stolen

Another Black Youth, World Can’t Wait high school intern | October 14, 2015

The only reason for you to think that someone wants to steal from you is because you’ve stolen from someone else.

Oh look at that brown boy with his hands in his pocket, look he just picked up a soda, look where he heading off to next, he looks like he’s about to walk out the store, let me call the police.

But wait, just wait to see if the reason why his hands are in his pocket is because he wants his hands in his pocket and guess what is in those hands. Not a gun, not a knife to threaten your life with but the money to pay for the soda, the same money that you gonna put in the  cash register to help support your store and your family. Can’t a brown boy get a break? Can’t he just be a brown boy in peace?

Justus Howell
Justus Howell is just one of those cases that just breaks your heart. This young black youth was murdered. All because of two components of being in the wrong place at the wrong time and, of course, the police didn’t stop, think, maybe he’s just chilling, hanging out, waiting for a friend somewhere. No, because they assume that we’re all criminals, that we all want something from them, that we want to steal and rob. The only reason for you to think that someone wants to steal from you is because you’ve stolen from someone else. The police take pride in racially profiling black men and women because they think we all look alike and we all do crimes. But they don’t stop and think while scratching their hairy asses that almost anybody is capable of committing a crime.

They always overlook the ones (white people) that seem like they could do no harm while accusing someone else of doing something he didn’t do and then taking his life away because of it. If you saw that the police were chasing you, wouldn’t you run too? That’s what Justus Howell did. He knew how poor innocent black lives are being taken and coming in contact with the killers he decided on something that many of those lives don’t get — the opportunity to run. The whole murder was caught on tape. Justus Howell shot twice in the back. IN COLD-BLOOD. How was he even considered a threat if: 1) he was running away from you and 2) he was turned around with his back to you.

We have less than a month till #RiseUpOctober National March to STOP Police Terror Oct 24 in NYC. It has been a year since Ferguson, and the police are STILL getting away with murder! Three people a day. And all the racist propaganda to justify it — the "courageous" police "feared for their life" because of the "threatening" (unarmed) Black youth. Enough is enough! Which side are you on? Let's get organized to make Oct 24 the most powerful protest against police terror this country has ever seen. Let's flood the streets of NYC, before the eyes of the world and put the murdering police and this whole damn system on the defensive.

In order for this to be a successful #RiseUpOctober National March we really need donations to help bring the families of the victims of police brutality to our march so that their stories and pain can bring us stronger together, forming a stronger resistance against the system. Only with your help can we bring Justus Howell’s family from Chicago to New York City. So help us to change the way our messed up system views our youth and our people!

Justus Howell was just a 17 year old boy who was minding his business and ended up being at the wrong time, wrong place. There was a shooting early that day that caused the police to be awakened from their dusty caskets and attack a young black boy who fit their description of someone who does harmful things in the community. Therefore he was murdered. He shouldn’t be remembered because he was murdered by the police. He should have been remembered for something greater and more meaningful. Nobody wants to get that phone call and hear that their child has died and you weren’t there when it happened and you weren’t by your baby’s side telling him “it’ll be okay.”

Bring 10 Families of Those Murdered By Police to NYC For #RiseUpOctober

To find out more about the World Can't Wait internship program, get in touch with the national office: debrasweet at worldcantwait.net.